Tasty & Refreshing; It’s Dish It Out!!!

Our First Indiegogo Campaign!!

Greetings & Salutations to all our friends & family & fans!

We are embarking on our first crowd funding campaign to create the Third Season of Dish It Out!! Your support for the past two seasons has nurtured our incredible cooking series that’s –

“….one part talk, two parts cooking, three parts garlic.”

Funk It Up With Dish!M

Funk It Up With Dish!

please share wide & far! No amounts too small, unless it’s garlic and every bit helps, unless it’s cayenne.

 

(click image to go see our Indiegogo )

Get Stuffed! Sunil Or Later! New Episode, great porkchop!

Time for swine.

Click for Sunil… Time for swine.

Cinco De Mayo!

Felicidades! Happy Cinco De Mayo to you and yours. Be safe, smart and thirsty mi compadres. While consuming beverages today don’t forget to eat and may we recommend our DIO!! Tomatillo Salsa? Que bueno! Recipe is in this post from last year. (Click pic for tip)  Tiene hambre?

 

in my belly now....

in my belly now….

Something Prince Would Wear…

“Consider the eggplant, shiny purple, tight skin. Like something Prince would wear.”

Eggplant is purple. Purple is good.

Eggplant is purple. Purple is good.

Aaaah, it seems like yesterday we uttered those words. They ring with the poignancy of Edison’s “Mr. Watson, come here. I want you.” It may just as well as been yesterday as it was three years, and four kitchens ago that we shot our first episode of DIO! Where does the thyme go, I tell you. It goes in the pantry, you know that.

Sista Sal and I lived together in a tiny little cottage on the sleepy CT Shoreline. Yes, Yankee Key West as I liked to call it. And I maintained the outdoors for she and I. We had hanging baskets, decorative barrels, pots, cans and window sills. There was a festive Perennial Love Garden chock filled with hasta, Allium and black-eyed susan’s. I grew giant-sized sunflowers that stopped traffic. There was bamboo. Side note, the bamboo grows spreads like, well you know, it spreads crazy like. It spread under the neighbors fence who thought he might harvest it.  He was sure it was asparagus. Oh, Yankee Key West. My point was around here and I know it will resurface. Like bamboo.

The size of our vegetable garden grew each year. It was lined with brick (we’re Italian) and subject to many trips by Ma (The Tomato Thief). Eventually a fence was put around it to prevent rabbits, deer and

plant a kiss on that fruit

plant a kiss on that fruit

yes, Ma. Every fall I buried fish breakdowns in the native american traditions to fertilize the soil. Our bounty was always  amazing. The tomatillo plants and the eggplant plants were the most amazing. Their leaves and branches had a jaunty raconteur nature to them. These plants were the “Zoot Suit Riot” of my 90’s garden life. Take a moment and smell the Seattle Coffee. Such a fun time.

Sista Sal asked recently if there was a great recipe for her bounty of eggplant and if it could be kid friendly. Sista Sal speaks, Li’l Bro listens.

Patties Eggplant:

  • 2 medium eggplants, peeled and cubed
  • 1 cup shredded Italian cheese blend (I like Tillamook)
  • 1 cup Italian seasoned bread crumbs
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons dried parsley
  • 2 tablespoons chopped onion
  • 3 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 cup oil for frying
  • Salt and Pepper to taste. 
  1. Place eggplant in a microwave safe bowl and microwave on medium-high 3 minutes. Turn eggplant over and microwave another 2 minutes. Eggplant should be tender, cook another 2 minutes if the eggplants are not tender. Drain any liquid from the eggplants and mash.
  2. Combine cheese, bread crumbs, eggs, parsley, onion, garlic and salt with the mashed eggplant. Mix well.
  3. Shape the eggplant mixture into Patties. Heat oil in a large skillet. Drop eggplant Patties one at a time into skillet. Fry each side of the Patties until golden brown, approximately 5 minutes on each side. Freezing Patties for half hour prior to frying help with keeping their shape. 

National Prime Rib Day!

It’s a meaty day, prime for celebration! It’s National Prime Rib Day!!!! Usually the stuff of proms and weddings prime rib is the most easily recognized celebrity meat.

yes, please.

yes, please.

The enormity of the entrée is the stuff of wonder. The tenderness of the meat is due to the amount of the fat in the cut’s area and the slow roasting cooking technique. As does the deliciousness, and some simple seasonings applied don’t suck.

I worked in an establishment that had the tastiest prime rib. It operated under different names over the years. Eileen’s and LL Chapman’s were staples on the Boston Post Road in Old Saybrook.  The chef was an old autocrat. Maurice Davies Blake was rumored to have cooked for the Truman Administration in the White House. He was very active in the CT Chef’s Association. The CT Chef’s Association’s membership also included my very dear Godmother Mary Marino (Their FIRST woman president) and her husband Joseph Marino. Maurice was a pain in the ass, and his food was the stuff of magic. The CT Shoreline (Yankee Key West) was eating Yankee Pot Roast, Hamsteak Hawaiian, Chicken Broccoli Alfredo, and Chicken Caesar Salad in the mid Eighties until their belts moved open a notch. These staples of his cuisine were so popular  throng of the same people lined up every Friday and Saturday to get some. Chef Blake told great tales of his former restaurant ‘Maurice’s, and Peggy’s too’ in East Haddam. He had a throne reserved for him in the lounge. He could see the entire goings on of his restaurant, and fans could line up to kiss his ring. He didn’t work the line in the evening, his talents best used in saucing and seasoning the prep for the night cooks. Things had to be as he wanted. Exactly.

Young Tony: (writing special board) Chef, what’s the soup of the day?

Chef Blake: Old Fashioned New England Corn Chowder.

Young Tony: (writes) Corn Chowder. 

Chef Blake: OLD FASHIONED. NEW ENGLAND. CORN CHOWDER. Write it like I told you or I’ll cut your god damned fingers off.

To be savored, Maurice in the above exchange needs to be read in a very thick Maine accent. 

His prime rib would run out every weekend night. It was that good, and the source of the expression, “While it lasts”. That last part may or may not be true. Maurice was so full of stories that you couldn’t discern bullshit from bouillabaisse. You would want to listen anyway as his Maine-iac accent was earcandy, like Tom Bosley’s in ‘Murder She Wrote’. The prime rib was in two sizes; King 16 oz, Queen 12 oz. You could almost cut it with a fork, it was so tender. The color was perfect red on the medium rares, pink on the medium cooking temperatures. The au jus was so amazingly perfect for it’s seasonings, we would consume it with loaf after loaf of fresh french bread. So what if our tables needed anything at that moment, we were in church. It’s twenty five years later and you can ask any long time Shoreline Resident if they know of this prime rib and they’ll smile broad and say, “oh, yes….”. Sigggghhhh. That was some good eating.

Go find some good prime rib tonight, you deserve it. Make your night a banquet you deserve.

DISH IT OUT EXTRA:

My favorite picture of Aunty Mary.

Aunty Mary and Julia

Aunty Mary and Julia