Dish It Out!’s Blackening Seasoning Recipe.

This recipe is an improved version of the DCS we have used in past recipes. Cajun and Creole Cooking calls for this time and thyme again. We love it on scallops, chicken, fingertips etc. You can vary the amount of salt to taste. We make it in a large amount and keep in a jar next to the stove. The recipe is similar to Chef Sunil’s at the Temple Of The Unusual (Creative Cooking

Sorry, Charlie

Ahi Tuna Sammich

, Westbrook, CT) but not exact as he won’t part with it. Rightfully so.

  • Dish’s Blacken Thyme Affair:

  • 2 T onion powder

  • 2 T garlic powder

  • 2 T dried oregano

  • 2 T dried basil

  • 1 T dried thyme

  • 1 T black pepper

  • 1 T white pepper

  • 1 T cayenne pepper

  • 1/2 T chili powder

  • 1 T fennel seeds

  • 4 T paprika

  • 4 T kosher salt 

Not Hiccup, Jicama!

Hot enough for you?

If that ain’t the strangest thing to say I don’t what is. Oh right, jicama is pretty strange to say. Jicama, sounds like it should be a Club Med destination resort. Jicama, God Bless you the people at the store will say to you. Jicama, Jicama, Jicama goes the magic incantation. Jicama, you so crazy, I think I want to have you for lunch.

And we did! Everyone knows what jicama looks like right? It’s that disgruntled looking root thingy found near the potatoes and onion and not far from the melons. Jicama is from semi tropical to tropical climates. It’s skin is like a thin bark texture, and it’s bark is worse than it’s bite. (I went there). The health values of jicama are wonderful, it being high in vitamin content, antioxidants and low-calorie. It’s also known as Mexican Water Chestnut and Yam Bean. But, I think Jicama is more fun to say. Jicama. Jicama.

Slaw went the raven...

Slaw went the raven…

Ter House Slaw #5

1 cup grated carrots

1 cup grated purple cabbage

1 cup grated jicama

1 cup grated white cabbage

Dressing:

1 small sweet onion, quartered

2 cloves garlic, smashed

1/2 cup low-fat mayonnaise or vegannaise

1/3 cup apple cider vinegar

1/3 cup olive oil

2 T sweet Thai chili sauce

2 T celery seed 

1 T Karma Tequila Agave nectar (or whatever sugar sub you have handy

1 T fresh lemon juice

1/2 t salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

1/4 teaspoon white pepper

Add first four ingredients into blender and blend. Stream in olive oil to thicken. Add remaining ingredients and continue to blend until desired texture. Check seasonings.

Toss shredded slaw with dressing and refrigerate for an hour. Re-toss Ter House Slaw #5 and serve to welcome guests.

 

 

Aye, That’s The Rub…….

Season One will draw to a close featuring a dish very close to my heart; Jambalaya! All that know me know that I spent some quality time working with a

Sunie

His wife let’s him rule the roost, the rest’s hers

Master Chef, Sunil Malhotra of Creative Cooking in Westbrook CT aka Yankee Key West. I was his man servant. Actually I was his barman. The food was Cajun and Creole. It made the people’s heads turn and their feet too. Great food. We shared a slew of laughs, beers and GREAT FOOD. There was some debate that people came more to see me than eat his cooking.

Spats: Sunie, you know that the people only come here to see me. 

Sunil: Spats, people don’t come here to laugh with you. They come here for a plate of bad food in saucy-sauce!!

Granted this debate was mostly in my head. “Bad” as in “you just might lick your plate”. And “saucy” doesn’t begin to time with Sunil. People flocked to eat Sunil’s delicious cooking. This all went down at The Temple Of The Unusual. Sunil strung out the CT Shoreline 25 years ago with an intoxicating little spice rub on his cajun chicken grinder. My repartee told new diners that heroin was a key ingredient in the cajun season ing that made people come back again and again. I used it until some freak in New Jersey started doing that for real. I was learning to edit myself at the time, good times. Creative Cooking’s cajun chicken grinder is one of the best sandwiches you’ll ever have in your life time. I dare you.

The Creative Cooking Cajun Seasoning is one of the most closely guarded recipe known to man. It’s a safe assumption that the only one knowing it besides Chef is his amazing wife, MB, but that’s not for certain. Sunil flat out won’t share the recipe.  Flat out. It’s cool because getting recipes from people that leave out one or two key ingredients from prized dishes fries my bacon. This secret may go down in ‘Grassy knoll’ genre of mystery. Sunil’s  balance of flavors is beyond me. He also has the right idea, “If they want it they can come down to the restaurant and buy it here.” Saucy sauce or what?

In 25 years of  having my first cajun chicken grinder I’ve dabbled in duplicating the spice rub. Not an easy processes, or inexpensive. I’ve burnt my mouth, nostrils and the kitchen wall. I’ve had red fingers for days. Patience in Process has brought Result. I’ve come to a great seasoning that stands on it’s own. The DIO Creole Seasoning (herein to be known as DCS) made Episode 8’s Jambalaya a Rockstar Dish. It was a key flavor component. We focused on layering flavors in this dish. It starts in our Lodge Cast Iron Dutch Oven, where Guest Sous (identity to be learned on Episode 8) browned some boneless chicken thighs. The chicken was coated in DCS. On to this tasty base went the andouille sausage. Then went in The Holy Trinity. On another burner we had our chicken stock working some magic (watch episode and learn the magic). As more veggies were plied and saucy sauces slathered the layering made sweet music to the nose. Music that moved Guest Sous to………….again, tune in and turn On.

Came hungry did you? Better Life wanted? Look no further, DIO has you covered, with our DCS!!!!! This is a rub to make you go “a dub a dub dub”. It will rub you the right way. Add more jokes here. Go mix some up and make your Pantry ‘pplaude! You’ll be awfully glad you did.

DCS

(Dish It Out! Creole Seasoning)

1 teaspoon paprika

1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1/4 teasoon dried thyme

1/4 teaspoon dried basil

1/2 teaspoon rubbed sage

1/2 teaspoon fennel seed

1/2 teaspoon dried rosemary

3/4 teaspoon white pepper

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

1 teaspoon kosher salt

Dish some out for yourselves! Soooooo goood.

And for those interested in differences between Creole and Cajun cooking, there are many.